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First, the fingers of Yakushi’s right hand are often slightly curled.Second, in some Japanese sculpture, Yakushi's right hand forms the so-called Yakushi Triple World Mudrā, known as the Yakushi Sangai-in 薬師三界印, in which the thumb touches either the index finger or middle finger.Hundreds of extant Heian-era Yakushi statues, an exceedingly high number compared to surviving sculptures of other Buddhist deities, attest to his prominence in those days. 192 pages, including an appendix, list of characters, endnotes, bibliography and index. Suzuki's book deserves a prominent place on the bookshelves of scholars and art historians of Japan's early religious experience.Most of these Yakushi icons, says scholar Yui Suzuki SOURCE: Medicine Master Buddha: The Iconic Worship of Yakushi in Heian Japan. For a review of the book by Mark Schumacher, see Impressions, The Journal of the Japanese Art Society of America, Number 34, 2013, pp.

Third, unlike images of Shaka, statues of Yakushi from the Heian era or after usually depict the deity holding a jar of medicine in the left hand.Concrete evidence of his worship on Japanese soil dates from the late seventh century during the reign of Emperor Tenmu (see below images).Originally venerated solely by ruling sovereigns and court elites for their own personal benefits (to cure life-threatening illnesses), Yakushi would later become the central deity in eighth-century rites to ensure the welfare of the entire realm.Paradoxically, scholars inside and outside Japan have paid only scant attention to the devotional and ritualistic context of Yakushi worship and the central role of the icon itself in spreading Buddhist faith. 192 pages, including an appendix, list of characters, endnotes, bibliography and index. Suzuki's book deserves a prominent place on the bookshelves of scholars and art historians of Japan's early religious experience. 192 pages, including an appendix, list of characters, endnotes, bibliography and index. Suzuki's book deserves a prominent place on the bookshelves of scholars and art historians of Japan's early religious experience. 192 pages, including an appendix, list of characters, endnotes, bibliography and index. Suzuki's book deserves a prominent place on the bookshelves of scholars and art historians of Japan's early religious experience.This oversight has been thankfully redressed by Yui Suzuki SOURCE: Medicine Master Buddha: The Iconic Worship of Yakushi in Heian Japan. For a review of the book by Mark Schumacher, see Impressions, The Journal of the Japanese Art Society of America, Number 34, 2013, pp. SOURCE: Medicine Master Buddha: The Iconic Worship of Yakushi in Heian Japan. For a review of the book by Mark Schumacher, see Impressions, The Journal of the Japanese Art Society of America, Number 34, 2013, pp. WHAT’S HEREIntroduction Origins and Sutras Posture (Standing or Sitting)Mudrā (Hand Gestures)Medicine Jar / Bowl Other Yakushi Highlights Yakushi Repentance Rites Seven Forms of Yakushi Yakushi Mandala (Eight Bosatsu)Grape Yakushi (Budō Yakushi)Octopus Yakushi (Tako Yakushi)Resources, Learn More RELATED PAGESYakushi’s Twelve Vows Yakushi’s Twelve Generals Yakushi’s Twelve Generals (Tōji)Yakushi’s 12 Generals (Butsuzō-zui)Yakushi’s Acolytes Nikkō & GakkōSOURCE: Medicine Master Buddha: The Iconic Worship of Yakushi in Heian Japan. For a review of the book by Mark Schumacher, see Impressions, The Journal of the Japanese Art Society of America, Number 34, 2013, pp.Her interest in Buddhist icons culminated in her 2012 book Medicine Master Buddha: The Iconic Worship of Yakushi in Heian Japan (Brill, Leiden-Boston, 2012, 192 pages). 192 pages, including an appendix, list of characters, endnotes, bibliography and index. Suzuki's book deserves a prominent place on the bookshelves of scholars and art historians of Japan's early religious experience. 192 pages, including an appendix, list of characters, endnotes, bibliography and index. Suzuki's book deserves a prominent place on the bookshelves of scholars and art historians of Japan's early religious experience. 192 pages, including an appendix, list of characters, endnotes, bibliography and index. Suzuki's book deserves a prominent place on the bookshelves of scholars and art historians of Japan's early religious experience.

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